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#61 Wadi66

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 06:58 AM

Santa finally got tired of my asking. He brought me The Perestroika Deception and New lies for Old.

I know, I know, you're probably thinking.... Wadi, what took you so long? Well the story goes something like this..........

Aw never mind, I've got them now and that's what counts.

I did notice that the prologue of New Lies is written by Larry Abraham in 1990. He seems to be a NWO believer. What are the chances that Golitsyn would allow this prologue to be added to his book if he weren't in agreement? Kinda took me by surprise.
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#62 White Knight

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 10:39 AM

Talk about Xmas presents I got Letters from Russia - Marquis De Custine. Has been on my reading list for a long time.

#63 bm_cali

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 06:59 PM

No mainstream publisher ended up being willing to publish these books, so Golitsyn was forced to rely on an arrangement set up by Chris Story, who was already at the time a confirmed NWO-conspiracy monger, and who has, since then, completely gone over the edge into the land of mental delusions and outright anti Americanism.

Sad it had to come to that, but such an unpopular couple of books was bound to run into publishing troubles in those days of pre-web-savvy business practices.

Golitsyn simply had to go with an unsuitable arrangement because there was no other way to be published.

Santa finally got tired of my asking. He brought me The Perestroika Deception and New lies for Old.

I know, I know, you're probably thinking.... Wadi, what took you so long? Well the story goes something like this..........

Aw never mind, I've got them now and that's what counts.

I did notice that the prologue of New Lies is written by Larry Abraham in 1990. He seems to be a NWO believer. What are the chances that Golitsyn would allow this prologue to be added to his book if he weren't in agreement? Kinda took me by surprise.



#64 Wadi66

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 07:10 PM

No mainstream publisher ended up being willing to publish these books, so Golitsyn was forced to rely on an arrangement set up by Chris Story, who was already at the time a confirmed NWO-conspiracy monger, and who has, since then, completely gone over the edge into the land of mental delusions and outright anti Americanism.

Sad it had to come to that, but such an unpopular couple of books was bound to run into publishing troubles in those days of pre-web-savvy business practices.

Golitsyn simply had to go with an unsuitable arrangement because there was no other way to be published.

Okay, I didn't know that. Thanks. That puts everything into perspective. So I could cut those pages out and not miss a thing.
If a heart beat determines the end of a life, a heart beat should determine the beginning of life.

#65 goodcomdeadcom

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 07:32 PM

Greetings, and God bless.

Looks like Viktor Suvorov has published a new book. I don't know if it's brand new or a re-issue of "Ice Breaker". Link to Amazon.com below.

http://www.amazon.co...7654349-6699240

Another book which seems to confirm Suvorov's thesis:

http://www.amazon.co...7654349-6699240
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#66 bm_cali

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:58 PM

Greetings, and God bless.

Looks like Viktor Suvorov has published a new book. I don't know if it's brand new or a re-issue of "Ice Breaker". Link to Amazon.com below.

http://www.amazon.co...7654349-6699240

Another book which seems to confirm Suvorov's thesis:

http://www.amazon.co...7654349-6699240


This is brand new. In fact, so new you can't order it yet. You can only get dibs on the waiting list for the release later this year. It builds on the foundation laid by Ice Breaker. I think I'll buy it.

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 07:00 PM

Book Review

"The Confucian Mind" by Daniel Wang (published by Xlibris), is an examination of Asian psychological makeup, that is, the "private reasoning" of Asians, which the author presents as being intrinsically quite different from the psychology of Westerners. Wang draws on Asian history and culture to illustrate his thesis. Wang focuses particularly on Chinese and Japanese cultures.

Wang describes Chinese and Japanese cultures as pyramidal, and strongly hierarchical, with top-down leadership, and says that relationships between superiors and inferiors in these pyramids closely resemble those between a master and a slave. While Confucian civilization is not sophisticated in the philosophical dimension, it is deep and rich in psychological content, says Wang.

He maintains that in Asian cultures, relationships with one's hierarchical superiors are tinged with the emotions of respect, fear, and dependency, far more so than in Western cultures. According to Wang, Confucian childrearing practices inculcate these attitudes from an early age. One could see this as an inherited survival technique in a society where for centuries one's social superiors often had the legal right to put you to death if they saw fit. This results in an individual and a society that is quite different from their Western counterparts.

In contrast to Asians, Wang says, Westerners generally perceive of themselves as relatively free and independent actors, and have a broadly egalitarian view of their fellow citizens. The fact that a particular individual holds a certain job or post or occupies a given slot in the hierarchy does not guarantee automatic respect for that individual in the West. Westerners have historically also enjoyed a much greater degree of social mobility in comparison to their Asian counterparts.

In his political analyses, Jeff Nyquist occasionally comments on the attitude or outlook of "Asian tyrants", and describes them as not understood by most Westerners. Wang thesis seems to support such statements.

Wang presents his case for the distinctiveness of Confucian societies through an examination of China's history and its cultural development. He does the same for Japan, and contrasts the two civilizations.

My copy of the book provides no biographical information about its author. To judge by his name, however, Mr. Wang is Chinese. His English usage, while excellent, also suggests this. The book is quite a pleasant read. Wang's detailed and effective presentation of the subtle subject matter reaffirms my judgment that he is Chinese and knows of what he writes.

Although I have an appreciation of some of the more accessible, external features of Chinese culture, such as Chinese cuisine, and Chinese traditional healing, I have had little up-close experience with the Chinese or Asian psyche. "The Confucian Mind" was quite useful to me by arguing that there are strong and important psychological influences present in Asian culture that are much less prevalent in modern Western cultures.

It was also useful in its presentation of a condensed history of China and its major cultural influences. Its presentation of Japanese history was an eye-opener for me; I had not realized the brutality – much of it structural - of Japan's early culture and history, particularly in the era of the samurai. Neither had I realized the specific nature and strength of Chinese cultural influences on Japan, and the specifically Japanese manifestations of those influences.

In summary, I recommend "The Confucian Mind", by Daniel Wang. His book offers valuable perspectives on the differences between West and East.

#68 buckrat40

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 06:50 AM

This my last input.
Both physical & mindful.
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#69 massrepublican

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Posted 07 October 2007 - 01:54 PM

I mentioned this in the Spy Wars thread as well, I just got done with The Secret History of the CIA and the author at the end is somewhat sympathetic to the Angleton angle.

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 02:17 PM

Mark Riebling has written an illuminating and instructive review of Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA, the book by Tim Weiner.

http://www.city-jour...07-10-05mr.html


#71 bm_cali

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Posted 15 October 2007 - 10:49 AM

Book Review


He maintains that in Asian cultures, relationships with one's hierarchical superiors are tinged with the emotions of respect, fear, and dependency, far more so than in Western cultures. According to Wang, Confucian childrearing practices inculcate these attitudes from an early age. One could see this as an inherited survival technique in a society where for centuries one's social superiors often had the legal right to put you to death if they saw fit. This results in an individual and a society that is quite different from their Western counterparts.

In contrast to Asians, Wang says, Westerners generally perceive of themselves as relatively free and independent actors, and have a broadly egalitarian view of their fellow citizens. The fact that a particular individual holds a certain job or post or occupies a given slot in the hierarchy does not guarantee automatic respect for that individual in the West. Westerners have historically also enjoyed a much greater degree of social mobility in comparison to their Asian counterparts.

In his political analyses, Jeff Nyquist occasionally comments on the attitude or outlook of "Asian tyrants", and describes them as not understood by most Westerners. Wang thesis seems to support such statements.



Even the Eastern Slavic and Central Asian cultures tend to be ones which are transitional between Confucian and Western. This owes to the fact that they were previously conquered by a quasi-Confucian culture, the Mongols. I know this well. Both myself and my wife have certain ancestors from Confucian and quasi Confucian origins. This is something which - I fear - even the highest leaders in the West understand, at best, at a purely superficial level - but most here in the West really do not get it. They think I am alarmist in my forecast (of a second Oriental empire ala the Mongols, but this time around, conquering the whole world). They cannot perceive how this game of Go is unfolding. I can, and this is worse than being in check in the game of chess. Not checkmate yet .... there is still a sliver of faint hope.

#72 bm_cali

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 09:07 PM

One for the Christmas gift list:

http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/140008105X

Accused of creating a bogus Red Scare and smearing countless innocent victims in a five-year reign of terror, Senator Joseph McCarthy is universally remembered as a demagogue, a bully, and a liar. History has judged him such a loathsome figure that even today, a half century after his death, his name remains synonymous with witch hunts.

But that conventional image is all wrong, as veteran journalist and author M. Stanton Evans reveals in this groundbreaking book. The long-awaited Blacklisted by History, based on six years of intensive research, dismantles the myths surrounding Joe McCarthy and his campaign to unmask Communists, Soviet agents, and flagrant loyalty risks working within the U.S. government. Evans’s revelations completely overturn our understanding of McCarthy, McCarthyism, and the Cold War.

Drawing on primary sources—including never-before-published government records and FBI files, as well as recent research gleaned from Soviet archives and intercepted transmissions between Moscow spymasters and their agents in the United States—Evans presents irrefutable evidence of a relentless Communist drive to penetrate our government, influence its policies, and steal its secrets. Most shocking of all, he shows that U.S. officials supposedly guarding against this danger not only let it happen but actively covered up the penetration. All of this was precisely as Joe McCarthy contended.

Blacklisted by History shows, for instance, that the FBI knew as early as 1942 that J. Robert Oppenheimer, the director of the atomic bomb project, had been identified by Communist leaders as a party member; that high-level U.S. officials were warned that Alger Hiss was a Soviet spy almost a decade before the Hiss case became a public scandal; that a cabal of White House, Justice Department, and State Department officials lied about and covered up the Amerasia spy case; and that the State Department had been heavily penetrated by Communists and Soviet agents before McCarthy came on the scene.

Evans also shows that practically everything we’ve been told about McCarthy is false, including conventional treatment of the famous 1950 speech at Wheeling, West Virginia, that launched the McCarthy era (“I have here in my hand . . .”), the Senate hearings that casually dismissed his charges, the matter of leading McCarthy suspect Owen Lattimore, the Annie Lee Moss case, the Army-McCarthy hearings, and much more.

In the end, Senator McCarthy was censured by his colleagues and condemned by the press and historians. But as Evans writes, “The real Joe McCarthy has vanished into the mists of fable and recycled error, so that it takes the equivalent of a dragnet search to find him.” Blacklisted by History provides the first accurate account of what McCarthy did and, more broadly, what happened to America during the Cold War. It is a revealing exposé of the forces that distorted our national policy in that conflict and our understanding of its history since.

#73 Legolas

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Posted 24 February 2008 - 10:04 PM

I finally found the time to read a couple of good books and post about them. The first is Comrade J written by Pete Earley, the story of the most important Russian spy our side has had in decades, according to the back of the book jacket. Jeff Nyquist mentioned this book in his latest article. I think it's valuable as a reference to the latest poison emanating from the Kremlin, as Sergei Tretyakov's tenure as a Russian spy spanned Yeltsin's presidency and part of Putin's. In fact, Tretyakov's birdseye view of Russian intelligence ops began with perestroika and ended with Putin. In light of his unique perspective, his warning to America is the point of primary importance. Here is a brief quote:
"After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the United States and Russia entered into what was supposed to be a new era of cooperation. The Cold War was behind us. We could become friends. Many in the U.S. believe today the old Spy-versus-Spy days are finished. The September 11 terrorist attacks shifted the American public's attention away from Russia toward international terrorism, especially Islamic fanaticism. Russia was suddenly, and is today viewed as an ally, even a friend of the U.S.
In speaking out, I hope to expose how naive this is. During the Cold War, in the Soviet military doctrine there was the definition of the MAIN ENEMY, which was also used by intelligence as a basic guiding principle. It was the United States, followed by NATO and China. What is the official guiding line for the modern SVR today? The terms have changed. It is now called the MAIN TARGET. But it is exactly the same: the United States, followed by NATO and China. Nothing has changed. Russia is doing everything it can today to embarass the U.S. Let me repeat this. Russia is doing everything it can today to undermine and embarass the U.S. The SVR rezidenturas in the U.S. are not less, but in some aspects even more active today than during the Cold War. What should that tell you?"

The other book I read, WITNESS by Whittaker Chambers, was by far the better of the two, in fact, I consider it to be one of the best books I have ever read, for several reasons. First, Whittaker Chambers is an excellent writer, writing from the depths of his being, very transparent. Secondly, the subject matter -- Communism, that concentrated essence of the Antichrist (from Karl Jung) which I fear will cover the earth for a short while, is explained and illustrated very thoroughly by one who was a devoted follower of Communism for 13 years, was touched in a marvelous way by God's grace, and began an amazing (and impossible) transformation that led, in the book, to the Alger Hiss case. The subject matter was immensely important for the people at the time of the writing of the book, and it is immensely important for us today. The importance has not diminished; in fact, it has increased and is about to reach an apex of crisis in the near future. Finally, the human drama and tragedy make the book exciting and compelling reading ( the length is 800 pages and I could not put in down). I think this is an important book for everyone on TFP forum.

If you would like to read the forward to WITNESS here is a link to it:

http://www.law.umkc....bersletter.html

If you would like to read a number of notable quotes made by Chambers in the book go to this site:

http://www.brainyquo...r_chambers.html

One quote from the Danish theologian Soren Kierkegaard that Whittaker Chambers would remember many times during his trials in life and one we would do well to consider:
"Between man's purposes in time and God's purpose in eternity, there is an infinite qualitative difference."

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 05:10 AM

Before I get into the intended subject of my post, let me say in response to Legolas' post above that a great companionpiece to Chambers' "Witness" is "Perjury", by Alan Weinstein. "Perjury" was published in 1978; it includes a detailed biographical investigation of Chambers and takes a close look at the Chambers-Hiss case. What makes it different from Chambers' excellent book is that Weinstein has the advantage of being an impartial investigator of the case, to the extent that this is possible. Weinstein's analysis leaves little doubt that Hiss indeed perjured himself.
-------

Ion Mihai Pacepa has written a book called "Programmed to kill: Lee Harvey Oswald, the Soviet KGB, and the Kennedy Assassination ".

Ion Mihai Pacepa was a general in the Romanian intelligence services in the days of the Warsaw Pact. He had high-level responsibilities for Romania's foreign and domestic intelligence services and was intimately familiar with the structure and procedures of Soviet intelligence, not the least because those structures and procedures were replicated throughout the Eastern Bloc countries and in Cuba. Pacepa had much interaction with the intelligence services of fellow Soviet-bloc countries. In 1978 Pacepa defected to the United States.

In his recently published book, Pacepa takes a close look at what we know about Lee Harvey Oswald's history and actions, and interprets or deciphers those facts in the light of Pacepa's knowledge of Soviet intelligence practices. In some cases, Pacepa has the additional benefit of familiarity with the personalities of some of the high-ranking officials in the USSR and other countries involved in the narrative.

Pacepa makes a convincing case that Oswald was tasked with Kennedy's assassination by Krushchov's government, but that the orders were rescinded for important political reasons, and that Oswald then took it upon himself to complete the job. In constructing his argument, Pacepa's background and experience enables him to see the significance of many facts that other investigators have overlooked.

I find no fault with Pacepa's narrative. We'll never know the real truth of the matter for sure, but Pacepa's interpretation is on the table as one of the best, in my opinion. It is the most coherent explanation of the affair that I have seen. Pacepa leaves the conspiracy theorists in the dust.

The only negative thing I have to say about the book is, well, its subject matter – Oswald. I get the creeps reading about the guy. How malign and maladjusted he was, in a banal sort of way. A nobody on the one hand, but a real creep, marked for loser-hood by his own choices. It is quite unpleasant to delve into the mind and life of an evil obnoxious jerk. Be warned.

#75 Legolas

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 10:08 PM

Thanks, Eskie for the tip on Perjury. I just ordered it. Sounds like a very interesting and well-written book. After tackling the 800 page Witness I think I'm ready for another 600 pager :) .

#76 bm_cali

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 10:15 PM

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post Mar 9 2008, 06:00 PM


http://www.theotokos...sc/smosher.html

Full review above

QUOTE
HEGEMON: China’s Plan to Dominate Asia and the World, by Steven W. Mosher

Reviewed by China expert Prof. Douglas Lancashire

In this his latest study of Chinese politics and society, Steven Mosher examines, in some detail, the current political scene in China, and offers prognostications as to its significance for Chinese foreign policy, as this is likely to affect East and South-east Asia in the near future, but also, ultimately, the rest of the world.


I recently finished reading this book myself. It's one I highly recommend. Finally, an American analyst who has his finger on the pulse about China, demonstrating that this is a country that warrants very great suspicion by the West.

The current policies by the USA and other Western nations towards China (including my country Australia) can virtually be described as appeasement. Desperate to do business with China, concerns about human rights and Chinese militarisation have simply been put aside, so the big Western corporations can do business with the Chinese.

Mosher points out a number of myths with regard to how China is perceived by Western leaders today. One crucial one is the false belief that economic liberalism in China will shortly lead to significant liberal reforms and progress towards democracy. Mosher points out that whilst the Tiananmen Square generation of students had much sympathy towards Western values, the new generation of Chinese students have been systematically fed a diet of anti-Western Chinese ultra-nationalism. The Red Chinese government saw the impending threat and countered it, like the pragmatic communists they are.

I have one issue of disagreement with Mosher, in that he believes the Sino-Soviet split in the 1960s was genuine as he also believes were the border skirmishes between those two countries. Consequently, Mosher seems a little confused that the Chinese have since become very friendly towards the Russians again, following the fall of the Soviet Union. However, for those of us who believe the Sino-Soviet split was an organised policy of strategic disinformation, it makes utter sense that this "cosying up" would transpire, given that Russia and China were never really anything other than the staunchest allies.

Mosher correctly believes China represents a considerable threat to her neighbours, but I for one do not believe this includes either Russia or the ex-USSR republics still under Russia's influence. The communists have bigger fish to fry.

It all spells out how hopelessly misguided my own country Australia is towards the Chinese dragon. Australia exports enormous amounts of iron ore and other minerals, feeding the Chinese industrial boom. Our politicians have allowed our national economy to become very tied to continued Chinese economic growth. We have allowed China to buy up considerable holdings in Australian commerce, and we even plan to sell uranium to Red China. And I don't suppose our Mandarin-speaking Prime Minister Kevin Rudd will be changing tack any time soon.

The sheer madness of Western foreign policy never ceases to amaze me.

http://www.worldnetd...RTICLE_ID=19656

Above is a fascinating interview with the book's author.



Shawna11
post Mar 9 2008, 11:04 PM



This is a good recommendation, as is Year of the Rat (Timperlake/Triplett), which focuses specifically on the Clinton administration's ties to PRC military and intel agencies, as well as to their organized-crime front groups, in order to raise campaign cash.

In a week or two, once everyone has had a chance to read the above post, I'd like to merge this thread with the larger compilation thread "Books of Interest."

#77 White Knight

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Posted 16 April 2008 - 07:54 AM

I've searched the forum, but nothing came up on this. I presume it's a new publication.

http://www.michaellevin.us/

THE NEXT GREAT CLASH:

China and Russia Vs. The United States

In The Next Great Clash, Michael Levin makes the case that China and the United States will go to war with each other within the next 5 to 25 years. As scary as this proposition sounds, Levin writes with a balance of tone and a force of factual scholarship that lead the reader to understand just how the United States, along with the machinations of Russia, finds itself in this perilous situation.

Though the premise may seem like the plot of a Tom Clancy novel, The Next Great Clash is no wild theory based on dubious research and spurious experts. Levin looks at the impending causes for a major global confrontation through economic, political, cultural, and historical lenses.

As Levin states, “This book is the result of years of academic research combined with almost a decade of my overseas experience in Asia; as a result, I am able to present the reader with history as seen through the eyes of China and Russia; this is not an America-centric book.”

Of special interest is how Russia, America’s Cold War enemy, has deftly positioned itself as the “swing player” in this real world game of Risk. Though the Soviet Union has fallen, Russia has much to gain by nurturing the East’s conflict with the West, while at the same time, it fears an all powerful China on its southeastern border. Levin carefully examines the fragile 400-year relationship between these awkward neighbors and the strategic partnership that has developed between them.

The author’s main hope is that The Next Great Clash will raise awareness before the clash becomes inevitable. By understanding the issues from all sides, it is hoped that China, Russia, and the United States will find a way to avoid World War III. However, time is running out.


http://www.michaellevin.us/Author.html

Amazon

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 04:55 PM

This is a review of the book Clandestine in Chile: the Adventures of Miguel Littín (La aventura de Miguel Littín clandestino en Chile). The book's author is the famous Colombian writer, Gabriel García Márquez; the book was first published in 1986.

Miguel Littín was a well-known Chilean film director of leftist tendencies. He was a supporter of Chile's socialist and Marxist president Salvador Allende, and was chosen by Allende to head Chile's national production company, Chile Films.

Salvador Isabelino Allende Gossens was elected president of Chile in 1970. A coup d’état led by General Augusto Pinochet in September 1973 resulted in Allende's death. General Pinochet instituted military rule, something he claimed was necessary to save the country from communism and economic ruin. Under Pinochet's rule opponents were often dealt with harshly. Many members and supporters of the political opposition fled the country rather than face possible imprisonment and worse. The film director Littín was one of the exiles. Indeed, he had the distinction of being on a government list of five thousand opponents permanently banned from returning to the country.

Littín spent his exile in Europe [in actuality, Littín spent his exile in Mexico, but since Pinochet was still in power and Littín still in exile when the book was published, García Márquez may have changed the location to Europe for security reasons], but he always dreamed of returning to Chile and filming a documentary of life under the dictatorship. After 12 years of exile, with the help of some friends in the artistic community and the organized opposition, he decided to make his dream come true. This would not be as simple as purchasing an airline ticket, however.

To reduce the possibility of being recognized by friends, acquaintances, opponents, and ultimately the Chilean police, Littín adopted a new identity before his journey. With the help of his friends in the theatrical arts, Littín changed his appearance almost entirely. Formerly a casual, blue-jeans and sweater type of dresser, he forced himself to wear fine suits appropriate to a successful Uruguayan businessman, becoming what he least wanted to be at that moment - a "self-satisfied bourgeois". He shaved his characteristic beard, dyed his black hair blond, and altered his hair style. He adopted an Uruguayan accent, and received some formal instruction so that his behaviour and mannerisms would match his legend. Litton was also provided with false identity documents that included his new name and face. According to his cover, he was an marketing executive who was visiting Chile to film footage for use in television advertisements for a new perfume.

Littín arranged for three film crews to assist him in filming his documentary. Each crew arrived in Chile separately, from a different country, with legal cover.

To complete the disguise, his instructors for the journey assigned him a new "wife". In real life, Littín was happily married, with three children. For the purposes of his trip, his spouse and traveling companion would be Elena, a young and attractive political militant who had not lived in Chile for over 15 years, had no record with the police nor any known history of political activism. Elena was experienced, having carried out several important political missions in various countries on behalf of her organization. Among her many responsibilities on this trip was ensuring that Littín followed the required security disciplines. This was sometimes a frustrating task, for Littín was a novice in the field, and his free nature rebelled against the required strictures.

Not without a few close calls, Littín films his documentary over a period of six weeks and leaves Chile without being detected by the government, although towards the end of his stay there were hints that he was under suspicion.

Among other things, Littín's film documentary included political and historical narrative set against the background of relevant sites and landmarks, interviews with members of the opposition and of ordinary citizens, and a look at the life of some of Chile's most economically disadvantaged citizens. The film was aired as a four-hour movie on television; the cinema version was two hours long.

* * *

García Márquez wrote Clandestine in Chile on the basis of a number of interviews with Littín. It is a short book, my copy is a hundred and eighty-something pages.

I enjoyed Clandestine in Chile immensely, even though my political leanings differ from Littín's. The book isn't a political polemic; it is, as the title suggests, the story of an adventure. An undercurrent of suspense runs through it all – Littín could be discovered to be a phony at any moment.

Littín's account includes occasional humor, but the book is not a comedy. Indeed, Littín briefly relates his experiences in the first day or two of Pinochet's coup. One gets the impression that as director of the national production company Chile Films he barely missed being one of the early casualties of the dictatorship.

I was struck by the high degree of skill and organization of the underground opposition movement, within and especially outside of Chile. They seemed to have a certain depth of resources, too – for example, they provided Littín and Elena with outfits of fine clothes appropriate to their supposed high station in life; Littín's shirts and other paraphernalia were monogrammed with his new initials; a pair of psychologists helped Littín with his adoption of his new identity.

I thought of the world today and wondered if there are organized political opposition groups of this type active now. One can imagine this in at least two ways – a "good" underground opposition working for "freedom and justice" against a "bad" government, or an evil opposition intent on destroying a good government.

I pondered the attraction of biometric identity mechanisms – it is harder for an individual to adapt a false identity if the image of his retina, his fingerprints, his hand measurements and his facial features are on record in a national database commonly used for identity checking. Anyone trying to duplicate Littín's feat in a regime having such an arrangement could have a harder time of it.

I think most or many of our readers hear at the forum would enjoy Clandestine in Chile as a story of human interest and adventure. The fact that it is a work of non-fiction adds to its appeal in this respect. You would of course have to overlook any objections you may have to Littín's political beliefs, but those are not preached strongly.

Chile is special in that not only did the nation endure a Marxist government followed by a military dictatorship, but they survived both and came out on the other side as a nation, traumatized but alive (yes, at the expense of many casualties), deciding their post-Pinochet fate not with another coup or a revolution but peacefully, via free elections. The opportunity to learn a little more about Chile's journey along that path contributed to the value of this book for me.

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Posted 26 May 2008 - 10:44 PM

Eurabia; The Euro-Arab Axis written by Bat Ye`or is certainly a book people should have on their bookshelf.
It is explosive stuff that will make conscious Americans wonder why on earth are the Leaders worried about being friends or making nice with the Europeans,they committed suicide long ago, but they just haven`t realised it yet.
Brilliant book.

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Posted 28 May 2008 - 06:13 PM

Someone has posted Anatoliy Golitsyn's "New Lies for Old" on the Net as a high quality PDF file. I can't predict for how long the link will be valid.

http://www.conspiracyresearch.org/...

I think the book is out of print, although there may still be used copies available in the marketplace. The book was originally published in 1984; the paperback edition was issued in 1990.

"New Lies for Old", written by a Russian who defected to the West during the Cold War years, explains the premise behind this forum. The book discusses Soviet foreign relations during the Cold War years.

This book is not particularly easy reading, nor is it for everyone. Its conclusions were very challenging to the conventional thought of its time – so challenging that they were labeled "sick-think" by Golitsyn's detractors within the CIA, including director William Colby. You may agree or disagree.